Aslambek Idigov, Islam Edisultanov, Rizvan Elikhanov Win Bouts in Grozny

Grozny, Russia – In a tough, rough fight, WBO #6 and IBF #13 super middleweight Aslambek Idigov (20-0, 7 KOs) retained his WBO European and IBF European 168lb titles with a unanimous decision over late sub Sherzod Husanov (22-2-1, 10 KOs). Final scores: 100-90 across the boards were fair but they also don’t reflect the flow of the fight.

The reason for the paradox is that the fight was fought in spurts. Idigov’s were numerous and they kept the Uzbek veteran on the defensive for the bigger part of each round. Idigov, 25, was throwing combinations but they mostly landed onto Husanov’s gloves, or were slightly deflected, or were taken well by the challenger. Husanov was often playing possum and was also rather passive – yet not passive enough for veteran referee Victor Panin to step in.

The Uzbek answered mostly during the third minute of the round. His spurts were abrupt, powerful, and he connected solidly with hard power hooks and overhand rights. Idigov had never been stunned but he was put into the shell at least several times throughout the fight. And so it was: the 41-year old was better for a minute, and Idigov was doing his part of the job for the first two minutes. Thus the scores were both fair and misguided.

Husanov, who was coming off an upset kayo of 25-1 Pole Robert Parzeczewski, has nothing to be ashamed off – a solid performance for a two-time (2000/2004) Uzbek Olympian.

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Russian light middleweight champion Islam “Sniper” Edisultanov (11-0, 7 KOs) crushed Pele Sadoyan (8-3-2, 3 KOs) form Tambov, but originally from Georgia, in four rounds. Shorter, bulkier Sadoyan had trouble getting in close quarters with Edisultanov, who – unlike his nickname – was looking to land multipunch combinations rather than single shots. Sadoyan was eating leather with increased frequency with each fought round. Edisultanov dropped him in the third and both outpunched and outboxed in the fourth. The Georgian’s corner chose to surrender after the fourth.

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Middleweight Rizvan Elikhanov got his twelfth stoppage in the same number of fight but the way wasn’t pleasing. Elikhanov’s opponent Mfaume Mfaume (who is now 16-8-2, 7 KOs) from Tanzania gave Elikhanov fits in the opening round, though he couldn’t keep him at distance and was eating punches at the end of the round. He started the second one also in style, threw several shots and… injured his left hand by doing so. Mfaume took a knee and was waved off at 0:31 of the second.

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Former WBC International flyweight titlist Mehdi Abdurashedov, now competing as a bantamweight, looked fundamentally solid in overwhelming Ukrainian journeyman Olexander Hryschuk (16-4, 6 KOs) over eight one-sided rounds. All three judges saw the fight unanimously in Abdurashedov’s favour, tough no scores were announced.

Hryschuk, 34, was trying to avoid danger by constantly moving along the ropes. He did have some success in the first three rounds but then Mehdi’s constant punching slowed him down, and he became a stationary target for Abdurashedov’s quick assaults. The Chechen fighter landed several big punches during the second half of the fight. He also dropped Hryschuk down twice – once in the sixth, and once in the eighth rounds – but failed to score a stoppage win. Mehdi Abdurashedov is now 9-1, 5 KOs. Former EBU flyweight title challenger has dropped his fourth fight in a row.

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Light heavyweight Apti Ustarkhanov (19-4-3, 5 KOs) dominated his fight versus Ukrainian journeyman Ruslan Schelev (16-18-1, 7 KOs), which was scheduled for eight rounds. Ustarkhanov was pressuring his opponent for eight rounds but lacked power to got the job done inside the distance. Schelev, 32, was lucky to go the distance and didn’t offer any serious problems to his counterpart. The result was a unanimous decision in favour of Apti Ustarkhanov, 30.

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Light welterweight Shamil Malsagov (3-0, 1 KOs) shone in a quick demolition of long-time Ukrainian journeyman Artem Ayvazidi (12-20-1, 5 KOs). Malsagov dissected his opponent in the first, rocking him all over the ring. The then started to land even more aggressively in the second, finally connecting with a brutal right uppercut, which had Ayvazidi’s nose broken and dripping blood. Time of stoppage was 2:08. Ayvazidi, 39, who has started his career with ten consecutive wins and brought Sergey Fedchenko to the brink of defeat in a split decision loss in his 11th outing, is just 2-20 over the last ten years.

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In a hard, tough rumble between two previously undefeated light middleweights, local favorite Saidkhusseyn Musalipov (6-0, 3 KOs) barely got past dangerous import Sergey Margaryan (3-1, 1 KOs) in an eight-rounder. Musalipov, by far stronger and broader of the two, tried to impose his physical power onto Margaryan, who was using footwork and scoring in combos to make his opponent frustrated. Margaryan was better ath the starters and during the last two rounds, while Musalipov rocked him several time in mid-rounds. At the end, two judges saw it for Musalipov, while the third ine scored it a draw. No scores were announced, while BoxingScene was in agreement with the latest judge: 76-76.

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Light welterweight Idris Adalaev (3-0, 2 KOs) scored a convincing unanimous decision over Uzbek import Odiljon Mirzarakhimov (2-4-3) in the TV-opener. Southpaw Mirzarakhimov was fighting for the first time in more than four years but still was capable enough to continuously score with a sneaky left uppercut. Adalaev paid little attention to the Uzbek’s efforts and easily dominated the fight with his power and sheer physicality. Mirzarakhimov was down after a liver shot in the sixth and final round.